Arthur Rizer – Law Review

Arthur Rizer – Directory of Law Review Papers

Arthur Rizer in the William Mitchell Law Review

JUSTICE IN A CHANGED WORLD: THE RACE EFFECT ON WRONGFUL CONVICTIONS

Arthur Rizer: Mitchell Hamline
Mitchell Hamline

On the front of its splendorous building the highest court in the land has written, “Equal Justice Under Law.” 1 The statement begs the question: equal justice for whom?

Arthur Rizer in the Harvard Law School National Security Journal

The National Security Threat of Energy Dependence: A Call for a Nuclear Renaissance

Arthur Rizer: Harvard Law School NSJ
Harvard Law School NSJ

For years, many have argued that the United States’ addiction to oil is one of its greatest national security threats. This article explores the national security implications of energy dependence from both an environmental and a foreign threat perspective.

Arthur Rizer in the The CONSORTIUM ON GENDER, SECURITY & HUMAN RIGHTS

Breach: The National Security Implications of Human Trafficking

Arthur Rizer: Consortium on Gender Security and Human Rights
Consortium on Gender Security and Human Rights

This essay discusses the connection between human trafficking and national security. The authors provide a brief history of trafficking law and a definition of “national security,” and explain how human trafficking is a threat to national security through its origins in unstable countries (on military, economic, and diplomatic levels).

Arthur Rizer in the Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy

GUN CONTROL: TARGETING RATIONALITY IN A LOADED DEBATE

Arthur Rizer: Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy
Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy

The Washington D.C. sniper attacks in the fall of 2002 saw the most recent shots fired in a battle that America has been waging for almost a century. Just days after the shootings, articles flooded the newsstands calling for additional gun control legislation.

Arthur Rizer in the Pepperdine Law Review

The Filibuster of Judicial Nominations: Constitutional Crisis or Politics as Usual?

Arthur Rizer - Pepperdine Law Review
Pepperdine Law Review

The scene played out in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington’ of the independent and moral-grounded Senator using the filibuster as his “line in the sand” against corruption is a romantic vision. The reality is that there is a darker side to the practice rooted in partisan motives and a disrespect for the rule of law

Arthur Rizer in The University of West Los Angeles Law Review

ARTICLE: MANDATORY ARREST: DO WE NEED TO TAKE A CLOSER LOOK?

Arthur Rizer - University of West Los Angeles Law Review
University of West Los Angeles Law Review

The phrase “Rule of Thumb” came from the time when a man was allowed to beat his wife, as long as the stick he used was not thicker than his thumb. 1 In modern times we have come to the understanding that women are not the “property” of their husbands.

Arthur Rizer in the University of Las Vegas School of Law Journal

Trading Police for Soldiers: Has the Posse Comitatus Act Helped Militarize Our Police and Set the Stage for More Fergusons?

Arthur Rizer - UNLV William S. Bond School of Law
UNLV William S. Bond School of Law

On November 24, 2015, the St. Louis County Prosecutor, Robert McCulloch, announced that a grand jury did not return a true bill and issue an indictment against Officer Darren Wilson1 for the fatal shooting of Michael Brown.2

Arthur Rizer in the Georgetown University

HANNIBAL A

Arthur Rizer - Georgetown University
Georgetown University

T THE GATE: BORDER KIDS, DRUGS, AND GUNS – AND THE MEXICAN CARTEL WAR GOES ON

Yet a new threat is upon us – one that is a greater danger to the American way of life than the Mujahideen foot-soldier who is 7,500 miles from our borders.

Art Rizer in the Indiana Law Journal

Lawyering Wars: Failing Leadership, Risk Aversion, and Lawyer Creep—Should We Expect More Long Survivors?

Arthur Rizer: Indiana Law Journal
Arthur Rizer: Indiana Law Journal

“We are a nation of laws, not men.” This motto—made famous by the Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison1—has existed since the founding of the United States. This maxim embodies the sentiment that, in order to prevent tyranny, citizens should be governed by fixed law rather than the whims of a dictator.

Arthur Rizer in the Willamette Law Review

Lessons From Iraq and Afghanistan: Is it Time for the United States to Sign the Ottawa Treaty and End the Use of Landmines?

Arthur Rizer: Willamette University
Willamette University

If the United States is the military Goliath around the world, then improvised explosive devices (IEDs)—homemade landmines1—are the smooth stones that have brought the giant to its knees.  IEDs are responsible for 69% of all combat wounded in Iraq, and 53% of those wounded in Afghanistan.

Arthur Rizer in the Catholic University Law Review

Dog Fight: Did the International Battle over Airline Passenger Name Records Enable the Christmas Day Bomber?

Arthur Rizer: The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law
The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law

Almost immediately after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the United States and the European Union (EU) started a battle over Passenger Name Records (PNR). After the attacks, the United States began to assign risk-assessment ratings to all travelers entering and exiting the country. As part of this risk assessment, the United States gathered passenger information, in the form of PNRs, from airline records.